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  • THE DINGLE PENINSULA

 

The area has had a varied and interesting history and is outstandingly rich in relics of the past - or our pagan and early Christian times. The Peninsula, from Blennerville to the Blasket Islands, can boast of more ancient monuments than any comparable area in Ireland. There are ogham stones, promontory forts, and ruins of both pagan and early Christian buildings, Norman Castles

 

  • ANTIQUITIES

There is scarcely a town land in the whole of West Kerry that has not its quota of ancient remains. Without a doubt the greatest concentration of these is in the Dingle and Ballyferriter areas

 

 

OGHAM STONES

In Ireland there are 300 Ogham stones. 121 of these are in Kerry, and of these 121, more than half are in the Dingle Peninsula. There is a good collection of them at Colaiste Ide, Dingle. Many ogham stones have been lost down through the years either through the ravages of nature, briars etc., or through the carelessness and thoughtlessness of people. There are others at Gallerus, Kilmalkedar, on the Blaskets and on the Maharee Islands.

  • THE OGHAM LANGUAGE

The Ogham language is very interesting and very mysterious. It is also very, very old. With the ogham language the history of writing in Ireland begins. The late Professor McAlester, Professor of Celtic Archaeology at UK. C.D. gave as his opinion that the ogham alphabet is based on a form of the Greek alphabet that was being used in the 5th century B.C. Ogham, originally, in pre-Christian days was confined to the learned, and the learned of those far off days were the druids. Ogham then was originally the secret language of the ancient druids. It was usually written on an upright stone, across a suitable edge, which is called the trunk line, and it is read from the ground upwards.
  • FAHAN

Fahen is about eight miles west of Dingle. Anything, which throws light on prehistoric times, is of interest. At Fahen there exists such a concentration of relics of the past, whose origin is lost in antiquity that it makes Fahen a place of fascination for the serious student of antiquity. From Cill Mhic a Domhnaigh to Dunmor Head there are more than 500 ancient buildings and monuments of various kinds. The place could very well e described as an archaeologist's paradise. Here you have a wonderful collection of clochans or beehive houses. They are stone buildings shaped like the old-fashioned beehives. 414 of them have been counted between Cill Mhic a'Domhnaigh and Coumeenole, and this concentration of them is referred to by the authorities on these matters as the Settlement at Fahan.
  • THE PROMONTORY FORTS

These forts were built as the name suggests, on a little promontory jutting out into the sea. The narrow neck approach from the land was fortified with earthen defenses, while they were protected on the other three sides by the cliffs and the sea. There is a chain of them round the coast of Ireland and there are seven of them in the Dingle Peninsula. It is difficult to date them as not enough excavation has been done on them.
  • KILMALKEDAR & GALLARUS

Kilmelkedar can be regarded as the ecclesiastical centre of the Dingle Peninsula fro the early days of Christianity in Ireland right down through the middle ages as far as the 15th century. On the hill above Kilmelkedar are numerous remains of beehive houses, a short distance away there is the world famous oratory of Gallarus, and the remains of other ancient buildings of the Gallarus Oratory type which have long since collapsed. There are several ogham stones of the early Christian area too at both Gallarus and Kilmalkedar.
  • CASTLES OF THE DINGLE PENINSULA

The Fitzgerald's had many castles in the Peninsula. One outstanding castle in the Peninsula, which did not belong to the Fitzgerald's, was Castlegregory. This castle was built and owned by a man named Gregory Hoare, after whom the place is called. The Castle was built around the year 1550 and has a very tragic history.

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Céad Míle Fáilte

THE LISTON FAMILY
BALLINABOULA,
DINGLE,
CO. KERRY
The Liston Family

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